Subdomain SSL - Adding Wordpress subdomain to Netlify

Site name: RyanPearson.website
Subdomain: travel.RyanPearson.website

The SSL cert recently ran out for the subdomain (travel.RyanPearson.website), which makes me want to bring the site over to Netlify, rather than dealing with NameCheap’s SSL renewals

So far I’ve only hosted static sites on Netlify and I’m interested in adding a WordPress site currently hosted on NameCheap.

I figure there could be an issue with the database and backend, or at least it will be new for me to figure this out.

I currently have the domain RyanPearson.website on Namecheap pointing to Netlify.

The subdomain travel.RyanPearson.website is set up using NameCheap Wordpress installation and databases.

Question: Is it easy for me to point this subdomain to Netlify without messing up the wordpress installation? I really don’t use the site much as it’s just an example of a webpage I made for my portfolio that I’m using to try and get a job in web development.

@RyanPinPB It will be trivial to direct travel subdomain traffic to Netlify. It will be very difficult to transition from WordPress to a static site. If there isn’t much content on the travel subdomain, you would be better offer grabbing a copy of it and starting fresh with one of the SSGs installed on Netlify.

Thanks for the reply. I figured it would be annoying to move this wordpress site.

The site is used as an example of my Wordpress proficiency and using “Advanced Custom Fields”, so transfering it to a SSG makes sense development wise, but not for this case.

I might just try to add the domain (and sub) to Cloudflare, which offers free SSL.

I’ve read that Netlify discourages sites being on both Netlify and Cloudflare, but I could turn off Cloudflare’s CDN (to avoid Netlify being upset by this) and just use the CDN for the subdomain maybe?

Maybe I’ll just pay the $6 SSL cert renewal or do the manual renweal myself

@RyanPinPB At the very least, you’ll have to turn off Cloudflare protection to use Cloudflare DNS with a site hosted on Netlify. If you abandon WordPress, however, you will have far less need for Cloudflare protection on a static Netlify site, so you could even transition to Netlify DNS to make your life easier.